dealing with a bleed

Top 10 things horse riders need to know about dealing with bleeding wounds

Top 10 things horse riders need to know about dealing with bleeding wounds

  1. If someone suffers a nasty cut, you need to stem the bleeding and clean the wound, but you also need to be aware that the injured person could go into shock
  2. The best thing to use to clean a wound is dampened gauze or a sterile wipe
  3. Do not use cotton wool, which can contaminate the wound with fibres
  4. If the casualty is bleeding heavily, cover the wound with a dressing and bandage – some bandages come with dressing already inside, and are easier to apply
  5. To dealing with bleeding large wounds another bandage may be required on top if blood is seeping through
  6. As long as there isn’t a foreign body in the wound, apply firm pressure with the bandage in a bid to stem the bleeding. You can apply further pressure using your hand to encourage clotting, or raise their arm
  7. If there is an impaled object in the wound DO NOT remove it from the wound
  8. Beware signs of shock
  • Their skin has gone pale and cold
  • Skin feels clammy to the touch
  • They feel sick and thirsty
  • They have a fast heart rate
  1. Know how to treat shock. Keep the casualty warm. Whether they are sitting or lying down, raise their feet to try and improve blood flow to the vital organs
  2. A casualty that’s walking and talking can be taken to casualty – they may even be OK to get there under their own steam. But if the bleeding is extensive, you may want to call 999.
Treating signs of shock
Treating signs of shock

Why not think about joining us on a specialist horse rider first aid course? To find out which first aid course is best for you check out our specific equestrian first aid webpage.

Medi-K and First Aid Training Co-operative have come together to run specialist equestrian specific first aid courses. For more information about our first aid courses please contact us.